Chia seed and phytic acid

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Chia seeds and phytic acid?

I'd like to know if chia seeds are bad for phytic acid. I read conflicting info on them. I hope that they are good because they have a whopping load of 177 mg calcium per 1/4 cup of seeds, omega 3s, and protein. We love them and are wondering if they are also to be avoided. My kids are allergic to dairy and it is really difficult to get in enough greens per day, quantity wise, and chia is so versatile to make cereal/pudding/thicken smoothies/etc.
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K

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Posted 5 years ago

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Ramiel Nagel, Author of "Cure Tooth Decay", Dental Health Advocate

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Hi K,

Unfortunately I do not have a 100% accurate answer for you.
Chia seeds highly likely are very high in phytic acid, because, pretty much every seed is very high in phytic acid. And what happens when you eat a nut or seed high in anti-nutrients is it tends to have the opposite effect. So for example, whole wheat has more phosphorous than regular wheat. But eating whole wheat in the end may lead to less absorption of phosphorous. This isn't always true, but it is true in certain circumstances.

So do the Chia seeds have highly absorbable calcium? It is doubtful. Is there a way to prepare the chia seeds to extract the nutrients while avoiding phytic acid. Yes there likely is but I couldn't tell you how to do it.
Sesame seeds also are high in calcium.

So what I advise people is to err on the side of caution. In which case, if you or your children have active tooth cavities, then I would avoid them to be safe.

Meanwhile 1 ounce of hard cheese has 200 mg of calcium. So I would focus on the tried and true way to provide for protein, fat, and minerals. Cheese. Hard cheese is the most dense in minerals. Of course raw and grassfed is the best.
Have you tried raw goat cheese?
You can try well cooked chicken bones, and egg shells.
http://community.curetoothdecay.com/c...

Also, the typical pattern I believe to be accurate is that diets that have nuts and seeds, work the best with diets that have animal proteins as well. Since I have seen some evidence at least with nuts that it can affect protein utilization.

So you can make your family the experiment and let us know if a diet high in chia seeds works? (I am not recommending that, but you can). Because I don't know. But I personally would not take that risk. I'd like to connect with the wisdom of people who know how to use these seeds before making assumptions, or have experiments done that could tell us how this would affect people.

The answer to this question has been given by Ramiel Nagel, author of the book "Cure Tooth Decay."
Learn how to remineralize your cavities naturally with the book, "Cure Tooth Decay."


Cure Tooth Decay Remineralize Cavities Naturally

A little more about the book:
Forget about drilling, filling, and the inevitable billing. Your teeth can heal naturally because they were never designed to decay in the first place! They were designed to remain strong and healthy for your entire life. But the false promises of conventional dentistry have led us down the wrong path, leading to invasive surgical treatments that include fillings, crowns, root canals and dental implants.

Disclaimer About this Post: This material has been created solely for educational purposes. The author is not a dentist. The author is not engaged in giving medical / dental advice or services. Everything you try here is done at your own risk.
© Ramiel Nagel, 2011. All Rights Reserved.

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K

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Well, I for one have been combining the chia seed with dairy products. For example, my "berry breakfast smoothie" which consists of organic whey protein concentrate (grass fed), kefir or yogurt, Surthrival colostrum, mixed frozen berries, and chia seed as the thickener/gel. If the calcium from the chia seed is absorbable, then you'd be getting a pretty good whack of calcium from that little meal alone.

As well, chia seed is a traditional food for some cultures and has a long history of use. How those people's teeth fare I'm not familiar with though.

I have many people telling me that the calcium, etc. in dairy products is not well absorbed, and I can say that my recent experiments of upping my dairy intake has left me with evidence of that possibly being true, as the more I up my dairy intake, the greater my calculus deposits on my teeth.

It seems that leafy green vegetables provide the ideal absorbtion ratios in that they have other minerals present that would assist absorbtion such as K, magnesium, etc.

As a child I gorged on dairy and had no cavities at all until age 20. I've had about 6 overall in my adult life, I am now 45. But I'm returning to my "dairy roots" and trying to up my intake since reading your great book. Taking the Blue Ice oil and butter oils, trying to avoid my beloved nuts, making more soups (I have always made bone broths), and generally following your protocol in the book.

My children were raised dairy free and their teeth seem really good in their late teens. We have not been vegetarians, but higher on the vegetable intake than the meat intake.

Chia seeds are very useful for a variety of things and we really love them here so thinking about the phytic acid aspect of things, I have really been wondering about their dietary usage. Thank you for you info at this time.
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amcramer

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Nobody addresses the dairy allergy-? I'm in the same boat... my kids are allergic to cheese, they break out severely from all forms of dairy - goat, cow, whatever. Yes I do bone broths, but it's labor intensive and my kids don't want to drink soup every day!
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Janine Lattimore

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Hi
I make bone broth in a slow cooker and find it really easy. I don't roast the bones first - just put them in the slow cooker with a good splash of apple cider vinegar and cover with water. I just let them bubble away for 2-3 days on the bench. This is the recipe I use: http://www.vanillasoul.co.nz/article_...

Also, I use broth whenever beef stock is called for so in mince dishes, stews, sauces etc.

I am wondering: what about soaking chia with a fermented liquid like wheat/rye rejuvelac? Would that reduce the phytic acid in the chia? (it would give it a fermented flavour though as well)?

Or, what about mixing the chia with a wheat/rye sourdough starter, letting it ferment for a day or so and then using the mix in baking? Just not sure about the effect of heat on the omega 3 in the chia, but chia contains high levels of anti-oxidants which have been shown to protect the omega 3 content of flax/chia seeds when cooked - you can also use low temperatures.

Just some thoughts - I like using chia too.
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Ramiel Nagel, Author of "Cure Tooth Decay", Dental Health Advocate

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I really don't know about chia seeds & tooth decay.
Use at your own risk, or reward.
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Chantal

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I love Chia seeds and they are high in phytic acid.I have been soaking them for 24-48 hours with lime juice ,then adding a little stevia or concentrated fruit juice for flavor.Chia Fresca is a drink made with lime water and sweetener.
I think this drink has been used by indigenious peoples for stamina.
Don't know about their teeth but soaking like you would any grain should make them Ok.Maybe Ramiel will comment on this.
Chantal
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K

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The thing is, if you are soaking chia, it will gel up. Then you can't pour off the soaking water, which would have all the phytic acid in it. So then you are still eating all the phytic acid because it is in the gel.
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Chantal

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I don't think the phytic acid remains after soaking.The Nourishing Traditions cook book which the Tooth Cure diet is somewhat based on recommends soaking all grains but does not say to discard the water.I had the same thought as you about phytic acid staying in the water but I think soaking breaks down phytic acid.somehow.As far as the gel goes,there is no way to use the seeds like soaked grain,you have to drink them.A company called Mama Chia makes some really good chia drinks but expensive,so this is why i do my own drinks.Maybe Ramiel will chime in about the soaking water and phytic acid.
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K

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I'm 99% sure that you are supposed to discard all soaking water because it contains the phytic acid. This fact has been in everything I've ever read on the subject over the years, OTHER than perhaps the Nourishing Traditions book. Now this is a really curious thing. Is it a matter of it soaking OUT of the grain/nut/seed, or is it a matter of it BREAKING DOWN/digesting the phytic acid? This is a very important point!
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zach.azeez

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Another blogger writing about soaking oatmeal with other grains, chose grains like buckwheat, wheat, and rye as co soakers because they are high in phytase an enzyme which breaks down phytic acid. So this may be a lead to the question. And then what is the phytase content of chia?
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Ramiel Nagel, Author of "Cure Tooth Decay", Dental Health Advocate

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I do not have that data.
Typically seeds have a low phytase content.
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K

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The only way around a dairy allergy would be eating TONS of greens, and yes, that is WAY more labor intensive. It is pretty easy to just whack off a chunk of raw cheese and eat it compared to washing, chopping, cooking greens. A man I know who is severely lactose intolerant gave up milk for years and his teeth went horrible. He decided then to drink the lactose free milk and his teeth were restored to health from that alone! That is an amazing story. So maybe it is worth the sinus problems that I have to keep on eating the dairy. I know that all the fermented stuff works best for me, such as kefir and yogurt. But my kids are VERY allergic and can't breathe when they eat dairy.
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Chantal

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Ok I've done a little research and it appears that soaking doesn't leach phytic acid into the water it neutralizes phytic acid so this is why you don't have to discard the water.Adding something acidic enhances the process.
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MR

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Would you please gives us some leads on where to learn what you've just learned about this? Thanks.
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Ramiel Nagel, Author of "Cure Tooth Decay", Dental Health Advocate

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There can be other plant toxins in the soaking water. So discard unless there is clear evidence to do otherwise.
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K

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Thanks Ramiel for chiming in! I guess this means that there is no way to soak chia seeds since they gel. Ditto for flax. You wouldn't be able to rinse them/discard. Especially since it is this gelling property that people most desire from these seeds.
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Ramiel Nagel, Author of "Cure Tooth Decay", Dental Health Advocate

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Hi K,

I would want to know the traditional way for using chia seeds. My guess would be to cook them. But I don't know, so I cannot guess.

If chia seeds turn to gel when soaked, then perhaps discarding the water is not the right solution.
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K

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The traditional ways that I know of for using chia seed involve soaking the seed and using the gel that forms in a drink with other fruits/herbs. So, the traditional method makes use of the gelling properties and does not discard the soaking water. Considering that chia has powered great civilizations of South America, its phytic acid content must be overcome by something in their diet.
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Ramiel Nagel, Author of "Cure Tooth Decay", Dental Health Advocate

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Hi K,

Yes it is possible that the seed was mixed with other things, that it was cooked and so forth. Also do you have reliable data to say how much the chia seed was used? I would say to use with care.
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zach.azeez

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Going back to the original question does anyone have data on the number of milligrams phytic acid per 100 grams chia?
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zach.azeez

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I was able to find data from AZChia
http://www.azchia.com/tables/CHIAcomp...
in the lower right corner it says 20mg/g was the average level of phytic acid. So this is 2,000mg per 100grams chia. So Rami's guess was right, they are pretty high in phytic acid.

Does anyone have data on fermentation methods and percent reduction of phytic acid in chia?
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Tony Nungesser

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If you want an easy way to get your greens down get a good blender like a Blendtec or similar like a Vita Mix (I use both). If you go here http://www.rawfamily.com/ you can see how this family does it.

Basically you can use different fruit but banana is easy. Put in a banana in your blender with about a cup or two of water and some Kale or whatever green you desire (but no root vegies!). Blend and drink. It might gag you the first time you do it so go light on the greens till you get used to it. This breaks down the cell walls and releases the nutrients and the banana makes it more pleasant to drink.

Enjoy!
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Chantal

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this thread is about chia seeds and phytic acid................not how to get greens into your diet.
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nancy abrew

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I am a naturopath and have resolved many of my clients dairy and gluten intolerances with homemade raw milk kefir's and rejuvelac. In my opinion, we are seeing so many allergies to these 2 offenders because of the over use of antibiotics which wipe out the bacteria in the gut.....and they are very difficult to replace properly. The bacteria are very specific to what they break down the best. Repopulating the GI tract with bacteria that are trained to break down wheat(Rejuvelac) really seems to help, as does Kefir which have bacteria trained to break down milk. I also use NAET and EFT though to help the body to not be so reactive as well. All of these applied together has been giving very high success rates.
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nancy abrew

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And I just learned about phytates too! Having my clients properly soak and sprout their grains before use in cooking.....I think will also be very helpful. So excited to be learning about this :)